gray eyed girl
Hello tumblr doge friends, I would like to talk to you about a thing.
My 10-year old pit bull, Shibby, has a Stage I Mast Cell Tumor, which is a fairly common type of growth for working class breeds, especially retrievers, boxers, Danes, Staffordshire terriers, and pits. For now, it is localized on his left leg, and has a very low chance of metastasis. The doctors in WV (where he and my parents live) removed the bulk of the mass, and the staff and students at OSU Oncology Veterinary were able to get it down to a manageable level with medication. He is currently receiving Prednisone and oral chemo treatments to suppress and hopefully shrink the remaining growth. We hope that he’ll pass the 6-month to 1 year regrowth period and beyond without incident, but nothing is certain.MCTs are caused by an overabundance of mast cells. They can manifest in a number of ways, usually as squishy or slightly firm subcutaneous (under the skin) lumps that protrude, with or without hair. These can be normally-colored to raspberry-colored, and are usually not painful, though they can swell, or ulcerate and bleed, which runs the risk of a secondary infection, or worse, it’s an indication of a malignant tumor. They can easily be mistaken for warts, skin tags, or harmless sebaceous cysts; only a fine-needle biopsy can confirm mast cells.
If we had been able to remove his lump even just last year, IT MIGHT NOT HAVE DEVELOPED INTO THIS CANCER. He’s had this lump for at least 7-8 years, and every time I’ve had it checked, all the vet would tell me is “It’s just a cyst” or “It’s just a skin tag”. I EVEN HAD THE MONEY TO REMOVE THE LUMP AT ONE POINT AND THE VET ADVISED ME AGAINST IT AS AN “UNNECESSARY SURGERY”.
A coworker and my boss both lost their beloved family pets to this disease last year. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, IF YOUR DOG DEVELOPS LUMPS OR SKIN TAGS, GET THEM LOOKED AT AS SOON AS YOU POSSIBLY CAN. The smaller MCTs are when they’re removed, the easier they will be to treat, and the less it will cost in the long run. They will also be less likely it will be to metastasize into other organs or grow back.
Please reblog and share!

Hello tumblr doge friends, I would like to talk to you about a thing.

My 10-year old pit bull, Shibby, has a Stage I Mast Cell Tumor, which is a fairly common type of growth for working class breeds, especially retrievers, boxers, Danes, Staffordshire terriers, and pits.

For now, it is localized on his left leg, and has a very low chance of metastasis. The doctors in WV (where he and my parents live) removed the bulk of the mass, and the staff and students at OSU Oncology Veterinary were able to get it down to a manageable level with medication. He is currently receiving Prednisone and oral chemo treatments to suppress and hopefully shrink the remaining growth. We hope that he’ll pass the 6-month to 1 year regrowth period and beyond without incident, but nothing is certain.

MCTs are caused by an overabundance of mast cells. They can manifest in a number of ways, usually as squishy or slightly firm subcutaneous (under the skin) lumps that protrude, with or without hair. These can be normally-colored to raspberry-colored, and are usually not painful, though they can swell, or ulcerate and bleed, which runs the risk of a secondary infection, or worse, it’s an indication of a malignant tumor. They can easily be mistaken for warts, skin tags, or harmless sebaceous cysts; only a fine-needle biopsy can confirm mast cells.

If we had been able to remove his lump even just last year, IT MIGHT NOT HAVE DEVELOPED INTO THIS CANCER. He’s had this lump for at least 7-8 years, and every time I’ve had it checked, all the vet would tell me is “It’s just a cyst” or “It’s just a skin tag”. I EVEN HAD THE MONEY TO REMOVE THE LUMP AT ONE POINT AND THE VET ADVISED ME AGAINST IT AS AN “UNNECESSARY SURGERY”.

A coworker and my boss both lost their beloved family pets to this disease last year. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE, IF YOUR DOG DEVELOPS LUMPS OR SKIN TAGS, GET THEM LOOKED AT AS SOON AS YOU POSSIBLY CAN. The smaller MCTs are when they’re removed, the easier they will be to treat, and the less it will cost in the long run. They will also be less likely it will be to metastasize into other organs or grow back.

Please reblog and share!

  1. shoulditrustyouagain reblogged this from misssatori and added:
    Princess Peanut was diagnosed w/ MCT on 9/15/14. I am still in some shock, and scrubbing the internet for all/any info....
  2. valauraxx reblogged this from save-the-pits
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  16. sugarscreamer reblogged this from zambiunicorn and added:
    shit my dog has these bumps :(
  17. rinny-from-the-stars reblogged this from lenappendcold
  18. lenappendcold reblogged this from misssatori
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  23. calliopeoracle reblogged this from misssatori and added:
    I’m keeping my fingers crossed for his full recovery. Signal boost for other pup owners
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